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10 Qualities to look for while Interviewing People

 10 Qualities to look for while Interviewing People
 
There's a lot to listen for in a conversation. When a person speaks, listen to what's NOT being said, as well as what's being said. The purpose of an interview isn't merely to learn about an applicant's skills or background  you've already gleaned this information from their resume. Listen beneath the words to who a person is. Listen for the qualities that most matter to the position and to the company.

1. Confidence & Self-Acceptance
Beneath the surface conversation, listen to who a person is. Listen for how comfortable a person is during the silences within a conversation. All conversation waxes and wanes  during the pauses in a conversation, listen for the level of confidence and self-acceptance a person has. When s/he pauses to gather her/his thoughts prior to answering your question, do you sense nervousness or anxiety? The level of comfort a person exhibits during the pauses within a conversation says a lot. Listen for the level of confidence and self-acceptance beneath a person's word.

2. Follow Through & Persistence
Follow through and persistence is the unique ability to engage in a project and see it through -- at all costs. The downside of persistence is the fine line that exists, separating persistence from stubbornness. Think about the qualities that are essential to the position - then, upgrade those qualities, envisioning a top performer in the position. Identify the desired qualities for the job - then pursue a line of questioning that will allow the quality to emerge. What line of questioning will bring forth the quality you're looking for?

To ask the applicant to "tell me about your follow through abilities" isn't going to reveal anything but an artificial response. Use your own experiences to identify impactful questions. What line of inquiry would bring out YOUR perseverance? A question about personal commitments and passions, or a question about your project management skills? My guess is that you'll learn more about a person's persistence by asking them about their passions vs. previous job responsibilities.

3. Integrity
Integrity is about being responsible for our actions and inactions; it's about keeping one's word -- to oneself and to others. It's about being responsible for handling whatever happens, and making adjustments so problems don't reoccur. When one is responsible, one doesn't blame or complain. Listen for how the applicant responded to situations in the past. Does prior behavior demonstrate responsibility, integrity and keeping one's word? Listen for level of ownership and the attitude one has in accepting responsibility. (Hint: You'll also learn about their leadership qualities in this conversation.)
4. Creativity
The most tedious jobs benefit when performed by a person who thinks creatively. Listen for the level of comfort in considering and/or behaving in an "out of the box" way. Don't confuse style with creativity. Creative thinkers can present very "ordinary." Listen to a person's mind when assessing their creativity. A bold dresser who looks "creative" might very well be a rigid thinker. A conservatively dressed person might be an extraordinary creative thinker. Don't let appearances fool you.
5. Standards
We're all motivated by our values, whether we realize it or not. Values are what motivates and sustains us. They are the core of who a person is. What standards motivate the applicant? Does s/he seem to value working hard and getting the job done at all costs, or does s/he place priority on communication? Is s/he motivated by setting standards of excellence and quality, or are her/his motivators about connectedness and team? Listen for what drives a person. By doing so, you'll have a better sense of "job fit."

6. Clarity of Communication
Communication isn't just about the words a person uses. It's also not only about the tone or affect the speaker uses. Communication is about being 100% responsible for the other person's listening. Communication is also about making a profound connection with another human being. It's about establishing rapport and being such an excellent listener that your responses perfectly answer the needs of the conversation.
How strong a connection has the applicant made with you? Did the person present authentically  or were they playing a role to impress you? Listen for how well a person listens and connects with you. This is a highly valuable skill with enormous benefit for your team and organization.

7. Personal Philosophies & Beliefs
What are the beliefs of the person? What messages do they embrace or are passionate about? A person's beliefs about opportunity will generate activity based upon their particular perspective and beliefs. Is their glass half full or half empty? A person's personal philosophy about life will tell you something about how they'll approach the challenges of the job. Guide the conversation to allow the person's belief system to emerge. Then listen for it.
8. Commitment
The word commit comes from the Latin word committere, which means to connect and entrust. Listen for a demonstration that the person has the ability to connect and entrust her/him self consistently to your product, service or organization. The ability to connect and entrust oneself is a key ingredient for rapport and building trust. Commitment is the quality that generates a consistent connection with another - an ability that benefits all types of relationships. Listen for evidence that the person can follow through on the connections they make - this is where commitment is found.
Connection + Consistency = Commitment
9. Passion
Success comes effortlessly to the person who's doing work they're passionate about. But, must a salesperson be passionate about their product to be successful? Maybe not. Listen for what the person's most passionate about - is s/he a people person or is s/he passionate about analysis? What motivates a person and lights their passion? When do their eyes sparkle with excitement? The more aligned a person is to their job, the more passionate and successful they and you will be.

10. Authenticity
Warren Bennis, professor and noted author of more than 20 books on leadership, change & management and who's advised 4 U.S. Presidents, speaks about authenticity as a core ingredient of leadership. He says: "Becoming a leader is synonymous with becoming yourself. It is that simple. It is that difficult."
How genuine is the person during the interview process? How comfortable with oneself does she/he appear? Authenticity is about being real & about being genuine - listen for conflicts that get in the way of a person's authenticity.
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Minimum wages to be split for PF Contributions

LABOUR LAW UP-DATE

 
MINIMUM WAGES TO BE SPLIT FOR PF CONTRIBUTIONS : HIGH COURT
 
In a democratic set-up, the hallmark of administration is to make a subject transparent, simple and free from intricacies as far as possible. It is, however, a different matter that our officials consider it a quality extra-ordinary to obfuscate the simple issue and make archaic what is straight one. Any important issue may hang in fire for any length of time but what can be waited is completed with tearing hurry. This mentality is also known Babucracy. It is a sad commentary indeed that our elected representatives either remain bogged down in petty politicking or do not understand the imports of administration. That is why; they have the least say in labyrinthine of governance leaving almost everything to the whims and fancies of the officials.
To cut the long story short, when the Employees’ Provident Fund Commissioner (Compliance) found that the grip of interference of the department is loosening due to catena of judicial pronouncements, his office worked overtime to find some excuses to tighten it and thereby avail the opportunity to heckle and harass the entrepreneurs. On 23rd May, 2011, the Addl. CPF Commissioner issued a circular wherein the minimum wages were not allowed to be split for the provident fund contributions with certain restrictions. This circular was enough to upset the apple cart and caused a lot of consternation and nervousness among employers.
Yours truly, who has always taken up the cudgels on behalf of the law-abiding employer, immediately wrote a letter within 48 hours of the issuance of the circular in question, requesting the Central Provident Fund Commissioner (Compliance) not to show any undue and undesirable haste and withdraw the said circular. He was also requested to properly assess and weigh the pros and cons of the judgment of Karnataka High Court, which was made the basis for the issuance of the circular so that no confusion could occur in the circle of employers. What was more intriguing was that the Nelson’s eye was turned towards more clear judgment on the subject delivered by the Punjab and Haryana High Court (This judgment is now upheld by the Division Bench of Punjab & Haryana High Court wherein the appeal filed by the Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation was dismissed, the intentions of administration were staring in the face, which were certainly different from what they suggested and our letter followed with reminders was also ignored.
Be that as it may, the same was subjected to judicial scrutiny and on 29th of September 2011; the Hon’ble Court of Andhra Pradesh in W.P. M.P. No. 28744 of 2011 in W.P. No. 23478 of 2011 as argued by advocate C. Niranjan Rao, passed the injunction order till the final disposal of the Writ Petition.
Earlier our colleagues Advocate Harvinder Singh and Advocate SK Gupta had filed a writ petition and the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi also found the prima facie infirmity in the circular dated 23.5.2011 of the Provident Fund Commissioner and stayed the same vide its judicial order dated 30th August 2011.
The representation of yours truly dated 25-5-2011 was not even acknowledged. However, when the Delhi High Court stayed the operation of the circular of EPFO dated 23-5-2011, the department issued a fresh circular on 27-9-2011 asking all the Regional Provident Fund Commissioners to keep the earlier circular in abeyance. Normal courtesy demands that the information about it should have been given to the Labour Law Reporter, being the whistle blower; but that was not done. We don't mind it but we certainly wish that had the decision for rectification of circular been timely taken the litigations could have been avoided.
The crux of the administrative law is that the principles of natural justice must be kept uppermost. Discretionary powers should not be reduced to arbitrariness. Bias of any type vitiates the fair play and justice. An administrative decision, that is bound to create confusion, must either be eschewed or be allowed to wait for some time to settle down the dust. It is hoped that the Authorities will not sit on the plank of any prestige and strive for promoting the congenial relationship between employers and employees with emphasis to growth and generation of employment. The minimum wages be allowed to be split in allowances for which either the EPFO should seek amendment of the ‘basic wages’ in the EPF & MP Act otherwise the order of Punjab & Haryana High Court be honoured wherein the EPFO has lost the battle firstly before EPF Appellate Tribunal, then before learned Single Judge and afterward in the Division Bench.
Highlights of some of the judgments to be reported in November, 2011 issue
  • Employers need not pay provident fund contribution higher than the prescribed ceiling. (Supreme Court)
  • A vague charge-sheet will vitiate enquiry. (Supreme Court)
  • Delinquent be heard when Disciplinary Authority differs with Enquiry Officer. (Supreme Court)
  • Gratuity can’t be claimed before Labour Court. (AP HC)
  • Travelling allowance is excluded from ‘wages’ under ESI Act. (AP HC)
  • Bias against enquiry officer untenable without supporting reasons. (P&H HC)
  • Gross indiscipline will justify termination. (P&H HC)
  • Nature of duties not designation is determining factor as to whether an employee is a ‘workman’ or not.
    (Karn. HC)
  • Dispensation of enquiry appropriate when holding is not possible. (Del. HC)
  • Removal justified when the employee neither complies transfer nor appears before medical board. (Del. HC)
  • Settlement for specific duration will continue to be effective till it is substituted. (Del. HC)
  • A charge-sheet for theft should be precise. (Mad. HC)
Also an informative article on drafting an agreement between Principal Employer and the Contractor so that it should not treated as sham contract.
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ONGC Class-I Executive Graduate-Trainee Jobs July-2011

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66 Strategies For Becoming A Powerful Human Resource Executive

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."
-Margaret Mead

Becoming a strategic partner to a company is an exciting challenge for any human resource executive. The suggestions set forth below come from CEO's, employment law attorneys, consultants, Chief Relationship Officer Forum members (www.croforum.com) and other human resource professionals. May they prove to be of great value in setting your career on fire!

Are You Up For The Challenge?


1. Are you crystal clear about what you want from your career? Do you really want to become a strategic partner? If so, why? How good do you want to be? Top 25%, 10%, 1%? How would you rate your level of commitment? What is the ultimate benefit you are after? More money? More power? More responsibility? Career growth? Greater acknowledgement? It is important to understand the big "Why", so you can refer back to it during challenging times.

2. Define what you like most about HR. Will you be able to do more or less of it in a strategic role? For example, will you have to abandon any of your "duties" in the role of "Employee Champion" to become a strategic partner?

3. Focus on your highest and best use. What can you do better than anyone else? What are you gifted at? Eliminate wasteful activities, outsource administrative ones, and focus like a laser beam on what you do best. Write down the five things you can do best and then circle the two things you love doing best. Chances are this is your highest and best use

4. Fast Company magazine claims today's mantra for success is "change, learning and leadership." To what extent are you conversant and able to add value to your company in these three critical areas?

5. How does your academic and professional background affect your human resource focus? Do you have a degree in HR management? Do you have a financial background, or one in sales? Do you need to broaden your academic background?

6. It is the expectation in corporate world that strategic partners have an MBA. Enroll in part time MBA classes and watch the perception of your value to the organization grow dramatically.

7. Don’t over commit. This is a quick way to lose credibility. Delivery is key to strategic success. Focus on three critical deliverables at a time. Do not dwell on trivial concerns.

8. Maintain your mental and physical balance. If you are over-worked and lack proper sleep, exercise or diet, you will make you a poor candidate for the executive boardroom.

9. Expect to grow. Like crazy. Sometimes in ways least expected. Your professional growth is limited only by your imagination. Dialogue with the President or CEO about your career expectations. Get their support for your career growth in advance. Use "up front" contracts. Get your understandings in writing.

10. Be prepared to address other people’s judgment about the human resource function. For example, some people may feel that "human resources is an administrative function" or "you don’t know about business." Know what emotional filters to expect and how you will respond to them.

11. Be prepared to accept the pressures, risks and rewards that come with being a strategic partner. Becoming a strategic partner involves many trade offs. With added responsibility will come added stress, as well as a bigger paycheck. It may also mean less personal/family time, recreation time, lunch hours, extended coffee breaks, etc.

12. The mantra for today’s leader is "the less you control, the more you can do." If you want to take on new responsibilities you must learn to delegate. Make sure you delegate to people with the skills and character necessary to be trustworthy so you can free up your time to focus on critical functions.

13. Be prepared to make mistakes…and take responsibility for them. The more risks you take and the faster you learn what doesn’t work, the faster you will advance in your career.

14. Think "out of the box". The "processional" or "lateral" effect of events and decision-making must be explored. In other words, be creative, experiment, test and find out.

15. Develop a strategic plan. Identify your long-term vision, the mission that will take you there and the goals that you must meet to stay on course. Put it in writing and update it every 90 days.

16. Read at least one business book every month. A great short book to read is A New Vision For Human Resources by Jac Fitz-enz & Jack J. Phillips. Dave Ullrich’s books, including HR Champions, are also excellent. Also, listen to books on tape. At least one per month. Many excellent books and tapes are available for free at your public library.
Dealing With Other Strategic Executives

17. Get their attention! You have to be your own best public relations consultant. One way to get someone to notice you is to send him or her an article they may find of interest. Send it with a simple "FYI" and let them be impressed with your business acumen.

18. Always be prepared when speaking with other strategic partners. You only have to be unprepared once to lose your credibility.

19. Take other executives to lunch at a restaurant you know they’ll enjoy. Then, when you get to speak with them, focus on them. Don’t tell them everything that you can do, dig to find out their needs and pain.

20. Understand something from the world of sales. Don’t focus on telling people what you can do. Focus on getting them to ask, "Can you help with ______?" Better it is "their idea" than yours.

21. Once you have their interest, get to the point. Executives do not like longwinded explanations – period. Find out in advance what their commitments will be if you are able to meet certain value-added propositions. Then write up in a one page follow-up memo to memorialize the understanding.

22. When presenting information, stick to one page "hot sheets." Too much information results in overload and shut-down. Keep it simple and let them know you have additional information readily available.

23. Do not allow yourself to be bullied, manipulated or sabotaged by other executives. Speak in "I" terms and make sure the other person does too. If they cross over into your emotional space or take credit for your efforts, let them know you feel such conduct is unacceptable and define possible consequences. Then do what you say you were going to do. Get help when dealing with villains.

24. Do not fear losing your job. If you find yourself fighting against a management philosophy that simply "doesn’t get it" then it is time for you to move on. Don’t fight it. There’s always another job. You deserve the opportunity to be a strategic partner!

25. Learn about the business you are in. Read industry related magazines and journals. Attend industry conferences. Learn the facts and trends. Speak the language.

26. Find out the vision of those at the top. Don’t assume their objectives or values, ask them. Dig deeper when the opportunity arises. Then help communicate it to the rest of the workforce.

27. Get involved in the strategic planning process. Create a strategic plan for your department. Don’t wait for someone else to ask you to do it. Just do it.

28. Ask for feedback on your job performance from other executives, as well as your subordinates and peers. Be open to their insights and suggestions. You want to create an environment of "radical honesty" when it comes to in assessing your progress. Ask what is going well, what can go better and what else would they like to share. Then say "thanks" and do something positive with the feedback. Immediately.

29. Be prepared to dress the part of a successful executive. You lead with all your actions and can’t afford to look more casual than your peers.

Money, Money, Money

30. You must have a complete understanding of finances. If you are not well versed in accounting, or cannot analyze a financial statement, consider taking an accounting class at your local community college. Go to www.amazon.com and buy The Great Game of Business by Jack Stack and The Accounting Game by Darrell Mullis and Judith Orloff.

31. Learn how to measure and benchmark. If you are not sure how to do this, read Jac Fitz-Enz’s book, The ROI of Human Capital: Measuring the Economic Value of Employee Performance. As the author states, today’s strategic HR executive has to show how he or she contributes to the organization’s service, quality and productivity (SQP).

32. Keep a scorecard to help document your success. Benchmark the costs of turnover, training, recruitment, benefits, compensation and other aspects of the employee relationship. Focus on leading factors more than past results. Strategic partners know how to speak in "bottom-line" terms. See the HR That Works! Cost Calculator.

33. Reduce the incidence of unwanted turnover in your organization. We estimate the cost of turnover for a $50,000 a year employee to be in excess of $50,000! How many unnecessary turnovers can you help prevent? See our Sample Turnover Cost Calculator.

34. Show how outsourcing administrative functions will allow you to focus on your highest and best use while saving the company time and money in the process. Potential vendors should be more than pleased to help you with this calculation.

Hire Only The Best

35. Your most important job will always be to help the company hire great people. This means pre-hire job needs analysis, meaningful interviews, extensive background checks, credit, criminal and driving investigations where appropriate, skills assessment, character assessment and drug testing. Develop a sound hiring process and follow it every time. We recommend www.brainbench.com and www.zeroriskhr.com to help judge applicant skills and character. We recommend www.infolinkscreening.com to perform your credit, criminal and other background checks.

36. Take full advantage of online recruiting. Online recruiting can cut costs and expand your hiring sources. If you don’t already have an online recruiting program on your web site, take a look at www.careerscout.com.

37. Involve co-employees in the hiring process. It is the first step in building team chemistry. Encourage and reward qualified candidate referrals. Have future co-employees involved in the interviewing process. Use the Co-Employee Applicant Appraisal form.

38. Form a strong relationship with a few temporary employment firms. Make sure they know your personnel needs. Make sure you know how they hire, train, compensate and manage their employees. If you face a downsizing, they can help by finding work for displaced employees.

39. Develop a fun and powerful employee orientation process. Cap it off by having the employee complete the 60-Day New Employee Survey where they give insight into the hiring and orientation process, as well as how they are adjusting to their new role with the company. Tap into their fresh insights while you can.


Increasing Productivity

40. Learn about how technology can help the h.r. function. Become a master of human resource information systems (HRIS) such as those sold by SAP and PeopleSoft. Once you’ve mastered that, then learn about workflow technology.

41. Get to know the management philosophies of Dr. W. Edwards Deming. He is credited with developing the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM). Read a Deming book and learn his 14 Principles. Take a visit to www.deming.org.

42. Study the competition. What human resource initiatives are other companies doing that are producing favorable results? How can you model or test these initiatives at your company? Remember, just because they did it first doesn’t mean you can’t do it too! Don’t get caught with a "not invented here" mentality.

43. Get familiar with character assessment and development tools by taking a half dozen or more of them yourself. Most companies (ZeroRisk HR, ClearDirection, Predictive Index, McQuaid, DISC, etc.) will allow you to take at least one free examination if they view you as a potential client. You can be in charge of increasing your company’s collective E.Q. We recommend www.zeroriskhr.com for the hiring process. Tell them we sent you and get two assessments for free.

44. Survey the workforce. Constantly. Use open-ended questions and don’t make responses optional or anonymous. Post the results. Encourage employees to speak up without fear. Consider using our Employee Survey. Test its effectiveness on a few of your employees to assure yourself of its many benefits.

45. Develop an employee suggestion program that works. Start with the I-Power program available for only $99 at www.I-Power.com. It’s based on a Peter Drucker suggestion. Tell ‘em we sent you.

46. Make sure your job descriptions are up-to-date and accurately reflect the "value added aspects of the job." Involve employees in identifying essential job performance functions.

47. Eliminate traditional performance appraisal thinking. It seldom improves performance. It is your job to help eliminate "more than/less than" thinking in the workplace and focus on what is going right and what can get even better. Save poor performance discipline for warning notices and counseling. Take a look at the Performance Improvement Dialogue Worksheet.

48. Help employees go through the career mapping process. Help them discover where they want to go and define the skills and character traits they will need to get there. If you can’t expand job opportunities for valuable employees you will lose them.

49. Train the workforce constantly. Education is the greatest form of leverage. Very simply, companies that train more earn more. Consider use of our Training Modules. You can further develop your training abilities by becoming a member of ASTD (www.astd.org).

Legal Compliance

50. Educate business partners on ever-changing personnel law obligations. Make sure your handbook and personnel policies are up to date. Help prevent claims by training managers and the rank and file. Either do it yourself, or work with your local employment law firm.

51. Think in terms of Management by Agreement. Bring employees in on compliance decision-making and memorialize the mutual commitments. In writing.

52. Work with an experienced employment law attorney to audit your personnel practices. Use them in advance to help make critical personnel decisions. What a company should be after is wise decision making – not cheap decision making.

53. Make sure your company purchases a comprehensive Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI) policy. Work with a knowledgeable broker to help advise them on different coverage options and claims management history. See the EPLI Coverage Worksheet.

54. Distribute the Compliance Survey at least every six months. Make sure employees know their rights and obligations and that no violations exist.

55. Get yourself access to the entire HR That Works! Program (www.hrthatworks.com). These materials were designed to help increase productivity and protect the bottom line – guaranteed!


Belonging and Mentoring

56. Meet with other human resource executives who strive to be strategic partners. Join a mastermind groups such as the citehr.com, NHRD etc or simply take each other to lunch. You will need the support of professionals outside your company if you are to become a strategic partner. Support each other’s challenges and help each other commit to getting things done.

57. Step up the depth of your relationship with professionals from the insurance, legal and accounting professions. Buy ‘em a lunch and ask a whole bunch of questions. Then immediately do something with what you have learned.

58. If you haven’t already done so, obtain the SPHR Certification from the Society for Human Resource Management (www.shrm.org) or IPMA Certification from the International Personnel Management Association (www.ipma.org). You can also get specialized certification related to compensation and benefits from World At Work (www.worldatwork.org ).

59. Be prepared to give back. Take an inexperienced HR professional under your wing. Help them discover their highest and best use.

60. Volunteer to a non-profit organization that can use an hour or two of HR advice during the week. Teach a class at your local community college. Remember, what goes around comes around!

61. Get out and speak to non-h.r. executives about the benefits of HR as a strategic partner. Be a spokesperson for the cause. Speak at Kiwanis, Chamber and other business events. Help people discover the power of building powerful employment relationships!
Get Paid What You Are Worth

62. Truly strategic HR partners are in high demand. Find out what similarly situated professionals are getting paid. Go to local salary surveys, check with your peers, and look at online resources such as www.salary.com. Check in with HR recruiters such as www.donnadavisassociates.com.

63. Negotiate for bonuses based on your ability to directly impact the bottom line. For example, if you are able to reduce unwanted turnover by 50%, what bonus should you be entitled to? How can you tie your compensation to your success as a strategic partner?

64. Shop around your resume. This does not mean you are not committed to your employer. It means you are investigating your true potential and giving yourself career options. This will allow you to negotiate from in a position of strength.

Publicize And Celebrate Your Success

65. Don’t just let your success stories sit there – publicize them! Use intra-company newsletters. Pin a note on the bulletin board. Send an article to an industry or HR publication. Send out an intra-company news release. Strategic partners know the value of tooting their own horn. So should you.

66. Celebrate every chance you get. Reward yourself and others when things go well – and for no reason at all!

CONCLUSION
Many consider becoming a strategic partner as the greatest challenge for today’s human resource executive. It is a challenge that beings within. You will have to shift your focus from administrative to "value-added." You will have to become a master of finances, benchmarking, planning and empowerment. Once you know who you are and what you want to do, you have prepared for success.
Becoming a strategic partner will be a rewarding experience. You can do it!

Who I Will Become?:
The three things I want to be well known for in my career are:
1)
2)
3)
Now Take Action!
Remember, the idea is to deliver, not over-commit. Stick to the "Rule of Three" and your success is guaranteed
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Baseline Survey for CSR projects/ Demographic Survey / Socio-Economic Survey

BASELINE SURVEY FOR CSR

Name of Station/ Site__________________________

Name of the village/city_____________   District___________________State_______________
DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE:

i.                    Population:                   (in thousands)      

ii.                  Age profile: Between 0-15yrs               %   Between >15-30yrs               %  Above 30 yrs                %

iii.                Sex composition: Male                %        Female                %

iv.                Literacy Rate:                %

v.                  Population below Poverty Line:                  %

vi.                Percentage of SC/ST in BPL population:                  %

vii.              Caste composition: Scheduled Caste                  %      Scheduled Tribes                 %


Directions for filling the survey questionnaire:

i.                    The following questionnaire consists of 8 clusters for which responses should be marked below the responses header
ii.                  Note that the data furnished need not be exactly accurate but must fairly represent the scenario.
iii.                Please ensure that no part of survey may be left blank.
iv.                Mention any sources of information used to provide the data at the space provided*.

1. EDUCATION
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Are there adequate numbers of schools catering to the village? If yes, specify the number of schools providing primary, secondary and higher secondary education along with average distance from the village (in kms).
Education
Number
Distance
Primary


Secondary


Higher


2.
Do the schools have adequate teaching staff?  Tick the appropriate option.
Yes                            No
3.
Specify the overall percentage of children enrolled and attending the school.

4.
Specify the percentage of children belonging to SC,ST and Below Poverty line families enrolled in school at primary, secondary and higher secondary education levels?
    
SC(%)
 ST(%)
BPL(%)
Primary



Secondary



Higher Sec.



5.
Percentage of families who can afford higher than elementary education?

6.
Percentage of school going girl child?

7.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken for education sector based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

8.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other important areas where projects can be undertaken under education sector.
1.

2.










2. EMPLOYMENT
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Specify three major Sources of sustenance?
1.


2.


3.


2.
Is there unemployment among families in the village? If yes, what are the reasons thereof?
Yes                         No

Reasons:




3.
What is the percentage of unemployment among SC/ST/BPL families?


4.
Are youth belonging to SC/ST families aware of career/educational opportunities after High school? Tick the appropriate option.
Yes                         No


5.
Are the youths (15-30 yrs) of the village skilled and qualified to find a suitable employment opportunity? If no, specify the percentage of unskilled youth and average education attainment.(Till class 5/Till class 8/Till class 10/ Till class 12.)
Yes                         No

Percentage of unskilled youth:

Average education attainment:


6.
Are there vocational training centres situated in the village or nearby area? Mention the name and kind of training provided.
Yes                         No

Name:

Training provided:


7.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to enhance employment opportunities based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

8.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other important areas of employment seen suitable by the people where they require skill enhancement/training/qualification.
1.


2.


3. HEALTHCARE
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Is there a hospital/healthcare center with adequate equipments and facilities in the village or nearby area? If yes, how far is it (in kms)?
Yes                          No

Distance from village:

2.
Does the Healthcare center/hospital have qualified and adequate number of staff (Doctors/nurse,etc)? If no, specify the requirement.
Yes                          No



3.
Are families aware of Govt. sponsored programmes such as family planning, HIV/AIDS, Immunization Programmes, National Rural Health Mission etc.? Tick mark the applicable
Yes                          No


4.
Any recurring chronic disease or illness suffered by villagers? If yes, mention the disease and the cause of the disease if known.
Yes                          No

Disease:

Reasons:


5.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to improve healthcare facilities/services based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

6.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other important areas of concern with regards to healthcare of the villagers.
1.

2.


4. INFRASTRUCTURE
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Is there electricity supply in the village?  Tick mark the applicable.
Yes                       No
2.
What are the main sources of drinking water in the village? How far are the sources from village (in kms)?
Sources
Distance(in kms)
1.

2.

3.
Types of fuel used for cooking by the villagers?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Is there proper sanitation/drainage system in the village? If not, specify the problems.
Yes                         No
5.
Are the approach roads in and around the village get repaired and maintained in good condition?
Yes                         No
6.
Is there proper street lighting system in the village?
Yes                         No

7.
Does the village have community centre/panchayat ghar?
Yes                         No

8.
Do underprivileged groups know about banking/financial institutions and Government financial schemes? If yes, mention any difficulty that they face for availing the facilities.
Yes                         No
9.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to improve infrastructure facilities based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

10.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other infrastructural needs of the villagers which can be fulfilled by Organization.
1.

2.


5. ENVIRONMENT
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Mention any ecological/environmental damage caused by Organization's operations in the vicinity of the village.





2.
Has there been deforestation in the village or nearby area in the past few years? Specify reasons thereof.
Yes                          No

Reasons:



3.
Do villagers know regarding potential hazards of pesticides?
Yes                          No

4.
Do villagers know regarding disposal of non-biodegradable waste?
Yes                          No
5.
Do villagers know about recycling of waste, rain-water harvesting and renewable sources of energy?
Yes                          No

6.
Is there contamination in any of the village resources such as water bodies, air, soil,etc. and mention reasons thereof
Yes                          No

Reasons:



7.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to restore environmental damages/minimize environmental degradation based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

8.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other important areas where projects can be undertaken for conservation of environment.
1.

2.



6. SOCIAL ISSUES
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Are villagers aware of ill effects of decreasing sex ratio due to female foeticide and infanticide?
Yes                          No
2.
Is there a significant number of villagers who are suffering from drug/alcohol/any other addiction? 
Yes                          No
3.
Are villagers aware of ill effects of child marriage/early marriage?
Yes                          No
4.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to eradicate social problems based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

5.
Specify any other social issue/problem prevailing in the social system such as superstition, caste discrimination, honour killing, domestic violence, dowry etc. Mention any other observation regarding social problems.









7. ART/CULTURE/SPORTS
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Mention any traditional art form/handicraft that is getting extinct and reasons thereof.

2.
Are there any heritage sites such as ancient monument, forts, palaces, secular architecture,rock-cut caves,remains of ancient habitation etc excluding any religious site, in and around the village? If yes, is it being conserved by any Govt. agency/Trust/Society,etc?
Yes                          No




3.
Is there any sports/recreational facility available in the village? If yes, mention the facilities available and whether they are adequate.
Yes                          No



4.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to support arts/culture/sports based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

5.
Specify any other important areas /activities where projects can be undertaken to promote Arts/culture/sports.
1.

2.




8. LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT
S.No.
Questions
Responses
1.
Are there Veterinary hospitals/Clinics/services in the village?
Yes                         No
2.
Are villagers aware of Government schemes regarding livestock management? If yes, are they benefiting from the schemes?
Yes                         No
3.
Are villagers aware about the  earning opportunities from the Livestock management such as Dairy farming, manure, biogas, etc.
Yes                         No
4.
Enlist the areas in which projects can be undertaken to provide for livestock management based on the above responses.
1.

2.

3.

5.
Apart from the above areas, specify any other issues faced by the villagers for livestock management.
1.

2.



*Sources of information/data/figures:
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